Pop Cash

Pop Cash

Hubble Sees the Eye of a Colorful Galaxy

This detailed image shows the center of NGC 1097, a spiral galaxy in the constellation Fornax, about 48 million light-years from Earth. These images show a negative impact of stars and streaks of dust on the surface of NGC 1097, with long-term dust occurring in a deep reddish hue. Two NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope devices, Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) and Advanced Camera for Research (ACS), demonstrate these complex models.

The idea that two different cameras can take a picture is not very simple. But it makes more sense when you look at the composition of beautiful astronomical images. Our eyes use three different types of receptors to detect light waves at optical wavelengths around 380 and 750 nanometers. Our brain translates specific wavelengths into color. On the other hand, telescopic cameras such as WFC3 or ACS are sensitive to a wide range of wavelengths to obtain optimal illumination. The raw camera image is always grayscale and only sees the amount of light captured at all wavelengths.

The color image of the telescope is created using filters. When you slide the filter over the aperture of a device such as WFC3 or ACS, only the light in the special wavelength is too high. One of the filters used in this figure is for green light at about 555 nanometers. This creates grayscale images that only show light at the wavelength, allowing astronomers to add color when processing images. The color range of this NGC 1097 contains images with a total of 7 different filters.

Post a Comment

0 Comments

Pop Cash